HPV PREVENTION

The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer. Prevention of HPV through vaccinations and regular screenings such as Pap Smears are essential components to prevent cervical cancer.

$10,000 can protect up to 34 children against HPV or 28 women against HPV and cervical cancer.

More about HPV & Cervical cancer

 
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The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted virus of more than 100 different strains.

HPV strains 16, 18, 19, 31, 33, 45 are the some of the highest risk and cause more than 99% of cervical cancers in women.

 
 
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Between 2010-2014 in New York City, 422.4 women per year developed cervical cancer (9 per 100,000), and 139.4 women per year died from cervical cancer.

 
 
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A simple and highly effective way to prevent cervical cancer is to receive a full schedule of HPV vaccines: 2 doses for children, and 3 doses for adults.

The HPV vaccine protects against strains 16 and 18, which cause 70% of all cervical cancer, as well as numerous other strains

 
 
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In 2016, 23.2% of women in New York City were not vaccinated against HPV.

Although this is a decrease from 2015 (34.7% of non-vaccinated women), it still means more than 1 in 5 women are not protected against HPV.

 
 

The CDC price of the HPV vaccine for children is $145.82 per dose, or $291.64 total for a full schedule of 2 doses.

The CDC price of the HPV vaccine for adults is $116.97 per dose, or     $350.91 total for a full schedule of 3 doses.

 

 
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This means that with $10,000, we can protect up to 34 children against HPV or 28 women against HPV and cervical cancer.

 

References

1. New York State Cancer Registry. Cancer Incidence and Mortality for New York City, 2010-2014. (New York State Department of Health, New York, 2017).

2. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Child and Adolescent Schedule. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 2017).

3. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Adult Immunization Schedule. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 2017).

4. National Cancer Institute. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines, (2016).

5. Reagan-Steiner, S. et al. National, Regional, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — United States, 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 65, 850-858, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6533a4 (2016).

6. Walker, T. Y. et al. National, Regional, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 66, 874-882, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6633a2 (2017).

7. Soper, D. Reducing the health burden of HPV infection through vaccination. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol 2006 Suppl, 83084, doi:10.1155/IDOG/2006/83084 (2006).

8. Winer, R. L. et al. Condom use and the risk of genital human papillomavirus infection in young women. N Engl J Med 354, 2645-2654, doi:10.1056/NEJMoa053284 (2006).

9. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. CDC Vaccine Price List, (2018).

 
 

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